Feb
20
to Mar 20

Racism and Public Education in Chicago [Chicago, IL]

  • UIC Student Center East (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

People’s fight to keep schools open in response to Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s wave of school closings demonstrated that public schools are an integral part of neighborhoods, at the heart of communities, storehouses of history and memory that bring people together. Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side interrogates Chicago’s public schooling, beginning with a story of systemic racism, inequality, bad faith, and distrust that stretches deep into Chicago history.

Student Center East, room 302. Presented by the UIC College of Education.

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Apr
7
5:00 PM17:00

Free Money Graphic Novel Launch [Toronto]

Register here.

Join us for the launch of FREE MONEY, a graphic novel story by Balkhis Hashi, Abigail Ralph and Naomi Ralph, illustrated by Janine Carrington.

Synopsis
Free Money is the story of best friends - Ruth and Alina - who live in Toronto when a new program called Free Money is launched. The program promises Black and Indigenous peoples free housing, education, guaranteed employment, and other social benefits. However, receiving "Free Money" requires that one loses their right to protest, forfeits existing land claims, and loses the ability to make land claims in the future. With training and help from Alina, Ruth transforms into a superhero, Afro-Afro, and together they try to save the people they love from the Free Money scheme.

Event Details
The evening will include a reading from Free Money & a conversation between the authors and special guest - poet and graphic novelist, Eve Ewing. Remarks will begin at 5:30PM and refreshments will be served. Copies of the Free Money graphic novel will be sold at the event.

The Toronto Media Arts Centre (TMAC) is a presenting partner for this event. The space is wheelchair accessible. is wheelchair accessible. If you require ASL interpreters, or have any specific accessibility needs, please email sefanit.habtom@mail.utoronto.ca.

With questions, please email sefanit.habtom@mail.utoronto.ca.

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Apr
30
5:30 PM17:30

DePaul University Spring College of Education Forum [Chicago]

  • DePaul University College of Education (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dr. Eve Ewing, Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration will discuss her acclaimed book: Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side.

Her presentation will be followed by a conversation with Dr. Horace Hall discussing the implications of her book and research for teachers, youth advocates and students preparing to work in urban schools.

There will be a book signing after the forum.

Registration will open on April 1st. For more information, please contact Diane Horwitz at dhorwit1@depaul.edu

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May
14
7:00 PM19:00

Celeste Ng in Conversation with Eve L. Ewing [Chicago]

Women & Children First is honored to host New York Times bestselling author Celeste Ng in celebration of the paperback release of "Little Fires Everywhere".

For this ticketed event, Celeste will be joined in conversation by special guest, Eve Ewing; the discussion will be followed by an audience Q&A and a book signing. This event will be held at the Swedish American Museum, 5211 N. Clark St. Each ticket includes a paperback copy of "Little Fires Everywhere."

If you can't afford a ticket due to financial hardship, we have a handful scholarship tickets available. Please email us at wcfbookevents@gmail.com for information. Please note: these tickets will be distributed on a first come first serve basis while supplies last.

The event will be followed by a book signing.

Tickets here.

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Mar
20
3:00 PM15:00

Demand the Possible: The Future of Chicago Public Schools [Chicago, IL]

For this year's Annual Bowman Lecture, the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy has put together a panel of visionary educators whom we asked to offer their vision of possible progressive futures for Chicago Public Schools. Join IRRPP and panelists Bill Ayers, Eve Ewing, Erica Meiners, Isaura Pulido, Dave Stovall, and Elizabeth Todd-Breland in a conversation about the future of public education in our city.

More info here.

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Mar
7
7:00 PM19:00

Cinema 53: Tested with Eve L. Ewing and Curtis Chin [Chicago]

What constitutes a “good” school, and for whom? Who is included in the vision of education as the great equalizer, and who is left out? This winter, Cinema 53 curator Eve L. Ewing explores the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America with a series of documentaries and discussions. Tonight, Ewing hosts a screening of Tested (Curtis Chin, 2015, 90 min), featuring education experts Pedro Noguera and Diane Ravitch in an award-winning exploration of access to a high-quality public education, affirmative action, and the model-minority myth. Followed by conversation with Tested director Curtis Chin.

Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation-provoking films by and about women and people of color. Curated by Gray Center director Jacqueline Stewart.

Free and open to the public. Find out more here.

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Feb
23
2:00 PM14:00

Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots - Opening Event

Marking 100 years since the 1919 Chicago race riots, the Newberry is launching a year-long initiative to confront the legacy of the most violent week in Chicago history. “Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots” explores 100 years of racial division through panel discussions, bike tours, film screenings, poetry slams, and more. The Opening Event kicks of a year-long series of conversations on the history and legacy of the 1919 race riots.

Following a dramatic, multi-media presentation about the riots, audience members will have the opportunity to join in breakout conversations about the following topics:

  • Housing and Color Lines, facilitated by Lee Bey, Architectural Critic, Photographer, and Writer.

  • Policing and Violence, facilitated by Robin Robinson, Special Advisor for Community Affairs at the Chicago Police Department and former Chicago news anchor.

  • Media and Race, facilitated by Chris Benson, Lawyer, Screenwriter, and Associate Professor at the Medill School of Journalism.

  • World War I and Chicago’s Black Soldiers, facilitated by Christopher Reed, Emeritus Professor of History at Roosevelt University.

  • An Artifact and Archival Show-and-Tell of the DuSable exhibit, Two Colored Women in the US Expeditionary Forces: The Story of Kathryn Johnson, led by Armand Gonzales, author, doctor, and teacher.

  • Young Adult book reading in the DuSable gift shop, A Few Red Drops, with author Claire Hartfield.

  • Video Booth: Record your own Great Migration or Family Migration Story.

The afternoon will conclude with a poetry reading by acclaimed Chicago poet Eve L. Ewing from her new book of poems about the 1919 riots.

Free and open to the public.

Visit www.chicago1919.org to learn about the project and to register for free programs.

Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the project is being coordinated by the Newberry Library in partnership with 13 other Chicago institutions.

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Feb
21
7:00 PM19:00

Cinema 53: Precious Knowledge with Eve L. Ewing and Ray Salazar [Chicago]

What constitutes a “good” school, and for whom? Who is included in the vision of education as the great equalizer, and who is left out? This winter, Cinema 53 curator Eve L. Ewing explores the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America with a series of documentaries and discussions. Tonight, Ewing hosts a screening of Precious Knowledge (Ari Luis Palos and Eren Isabel McGinnis, 2012, 75 min), which follows what happened when Arizona lawmakers passed a bill giving unilateral power to the State Superintendent to abolish ethnic studies classes, and teachers and student leaders fought to save the program using texts, Facebook, optimism, and a megaphone. Film followed by conversation with Ray Salazar, Board Certified CPS teacher and award-winning ed writer.

Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation-provoking films by and about women and people of color. Curated by Gray Center director Jacqueline Stewart.

Free and open to the public. Find out more here.

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Feb
19
6:30 PM18:30

Surprise Bookshelf Series: Ross Gay in Conversation with Eve Ewing [Chicago]

Tickets here.

Ross Gay’s The Book of Delights is a genre-defying book of essays—some as short as a paragraph; some as long as five pages—that record the small joys that occurred in one year, from birthday to birthday, and that we often overlook in our busy lives. His is a meditation on delight that takes a clear-eyed view of the complexities, even the terrors, in his life, including living in America as a black man; the ecological and psychic violence of our consumer culture; the loss of those he loves. Among Gay’s funny, poetic, philosophical delights: the way Botan Rice Candy wrappers melt in your mouth, the volunteer crossing guard with a pronounced tremor whom he imagines as a kind of boat-woman escorting pedestrians across the River Styx, a friend’s unabashed use of air quotes, pickup basketball games, the silent nod of acknowledgment between black people. And more than any other subject, Gay celebrates the beauty of the natural world—his garden, the flowers in the sidewalk, the birds, the bees, the mushrooms, the trees.

This is not a book of how-to or inspiration, though it could be read that way. Fans of Roxane Gay, Maggie Nelson, and Kiese Laymon will revel in Gay’s voice, and his insights. The Book of Delights is about our connection to the world, to each other, and the rewards that come from a life closely observed. Gay’s pieces serve as a powerful and necessary reminder that we can, and should, stake out a space in our lives for delight. 

Ross Gay is the author of three books of poetry, including Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Catalog was also a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, the Ohioana Book Award, the Balcones Poetry Prize, the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award, and it was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. He is a founding board member of the Bloomington Community Orchard, a non-profit, free-fruit-for-all food justice and joy project. Gay has received fellowships from Cave Canem, the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He teaches at Indiana University.

Ross Gay appears in conversation with Dr. Eve L. Ewing, a sociologist of education and a writer from Chicago. She is the author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side. She is also author of Electric Arches, which received awards from the American Library Association and the Poetry Society of America and was named one of the year's best books by NPR and the Chicago Tribune. She is the co-author (with Nate Marshall) of the play No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks. She also writes the Ironheart series for Marvel Comics. Ewing is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her work has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and many other venues.

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Feb
15
to Feb 16

Black Poetry: A Conference [Princeton, NJ]

February 15 and 16. Free and open to the public. Registration required. For more info, go here.

Poets include Elizabeth Alexander, Jericho Brown, Mahogany L. Browne, Kwame Dawes, Toi Derricotte, Rita Dove, Camille Dungy, Cornelius Eady, Eve Ewing, Nikky Finney, Vievee Francis, Joanne V. Gabbin, Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Myronn Hardy, Terrance Hayes, Tyehimba Jess, Taylor Johnson, Saeed Jones, Douglas Kearney, Yusef Komunyakaa, Deana Lawson, Robin Coste Lewis, Nathaniel Mackey, Haki Madhubuti, Dawn Lundy Martin, J Mase III, Shane McCrae, Jessica Care Moore, Fred Moten, Harryette Mullen, Morgan Parker, M. NourbeSe Philip, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, Koleka Putuma, Roger Reeves, Ed Roberson, Sonia Sanchez, Lemn Sissay, Patricia Smith, Natasha Trethewey, Simone White, and Kevin Young.

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Jan
24
7:00 PM19:00

Cinema 53: American Promise with Eve L. Ewing and Amanda Lewis [Chicago]

What constitutes a “good” school, and for whom? Who is included in the vision of education as the great equalizer, and who is left out? This winter, Cinema 53 curator Eve L. Ewing explores the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America with a series of documentaries and discussions. Tonight, Ewing hosts a screening of American Promise, a rare look into the lives of two middle class Black families as they navigate the ups and downs of educating their sons. From PreK to high school, we see the families struggle with stereotypes and identity, navigate learning differences that later become diagnoses, and ultimately take increasingly divergent paths on their road to graduation. (Joe Brewster and Michèle Stephenson, 2013, 135 min) Followed by conversation with Amanda Lewis, Director of the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy, UIC.

Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation-provoking films by and about women and people of color. Curated by Gray Center director Jacqueline Stewart.

Free and open to the public. Find out more here.


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Jan
19
6:30 PM18:30

APPEARANCE CANCELLED - The Schomburg Center's 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival [NYC]

THIS APPEARANCE IS CANCELLED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER IN CHICAGO AND FLIGHT CANCELLATIONS. THE EVENT IS NOT CANCELLED.

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture invites comic book fans of all ages to participate in its 7th Annual Black Comic Book Festival.

The festival will be held on Friday, January 18 from 12 PM - 7:30PM and on Saturday, January 19 from 10 AM to 7:30PM. Registration for both days is free and is open to the public.

Each year, the Schomburg’s Black Comic Book Festival brings creators, illustrators, writers, and independent publishers together with thousands of collectors, blerds and nerds for two days of programming and activities. The highly-anticipated community event includes interactive panel discussions, a vendor marketplace featuring exclusive titles by Black creators, a cosplay show, and more.

Black Comic Book Festival participants are encouraged to wear their favorite cosplay costumes and to register on-site for the annual cosplay show. Participants are also invited to contribute to the Schomburg Center’s growing collection of Black independent comic books by bringing single copies of old or new titles from their home collection. All donations will become a part of the Schomburg’s unique and growing archive documenting Black comix and the Black speculative arts movement.

Eve Ewing will appear at the event on Saturday, January 19.

Free and open to the public. To register, go here.

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Dec
11
6:00 PM18:00

Legacies of the Civil Rights Era: Race, Equity, and Education [Chicago, IL]

A Facing History Now forum featuring Dr. Eve Ewing, a poet, a writer, a former Facing History teacher, and now a sociologist of education at the University of Chicago, and Dr. Terrence Roberts, one of the “Little Rock Nine” who desegregated Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957. Together they will discuss the legacies of the civil rights era on our city and our current education system.

More info here.

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Dec
4
12:00 PM12:00

Scherer Center Lecture [Chicago, IL]

Ghosts of 1919: Rendering A City and a Riot in Poetry and Prose. Sociologist and poet Eve L. Ewing presents passages from her new book Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side. She will discuss how this book has inspired 1919, her new collection of poems about the 1919 race riots, from which she will read selections. A Q&A will follow the readings. Co-Sponsored with the Committee on Creative Writing.

Free and open to the public. More info here.

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Nov
29
5:00 PM17:00

Ghosts in the Schoolyard Discussion [Philadelphia, PA]

NOTE CORRECTED TIME. THIS EVENT BEGINS AT 5 PM.

In this panel discussion, Eve L. Ewing will share insights from Ghosts in the Schoolyard with local voices who will speak on the book’s connections to the Philadelphia context, such as Camika Royal of Loyola University (Maryland) and Koby Murphy of the Philadelphia Student Union. Sponsored by the Philadelphia Black History Collaborative, Uncle Bobbie’s Coffee and Books, and Swarthmore College.

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Nov
26
6:00 PM18:00

Creating an Equitable City [Chicago, IL]

  • School of Social Service Administration (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Note the updated time — this event begins at 6 PM.

In more equitable school systems we find more students who are well-educated, self-aware, and well-grounded in their own identity — and thus able to build strong relationships with people who are different than them. This is the foundation of building a more just, equitable, and inclusive future for Chicago. Join us for this panel conversation on how we can create more equitable schools and communities that lay the foundation for a more just and inclusive society.

Panelists will be Eve L. Ewing, SSA Assistant Professor and Author, and Marisa Novara, Vice President of the Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) and SSA alumna. Moderated by Tawa Mitchell, Program Officer at the MacArthur Foundation and SSA alumna.

Free and open to the public. Register here.

This event will be livestreamed.

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Nov
13
7:00 PM19:00

Ghosts in the Schoolyard Conversation with Ta-Nehisi Coates [DC]

Lauded author and journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates interviews writer and sociologist Eve L. Ewing about her new book, Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side. Join us for an intimate conversation between two of the nation's most thoughtful cultural critics on matters of race, politics, and society.

Note updated time. This event is at 7:00 PM.

This event will be livestreamed! Visit cas.american.edu on November 13 at 7 PM EST to access the livestream.

This is a free event, but RSVP is required.

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Nov
12
7:00 PM19:00

Ghosts in the Schoolyard - Conversation with Michael Ralph [NYC]

Join us in the Rare Book Room as Eve L. Ewing sits down with NYU's Michael Ralph to discuss her book and the state of the education system in the United States.

This event is free, but please RSVP here.

Special thanks to NYU and the following sponsors:

  • Department of Social Cultural Analysis

  • Race and Public Space

  • Institute for Public Knowledge

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Nov
9
6:00 PM18:00

Du Bois Scholars Institute Gala [NYC]

  • United Federation of Teachers Headquarters (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The W.E.B. Du Bois Scholars Institute Anniversary Gala celebrates 30 years of positively impacting students academically, socially, and culturally. Housed on the campus of Princeton University, the W.E.B. Du Bois Scholars Institute is a leadership development organization for adolescents and secondary students from families and communities who have experienced historical barriers to achievement and opportunity. Through academic rigor, collaborative learning, collective problem solving, and individual attention and support, we prepare students for success in college and their careers and to become leaders and positive change agents in their communities.

Join us for an evening to celebrate past and present students, parents, faculty, staff, and honorees. The evening includes the presentation of the Distinguished Leadership Award to Nikole Hannah-Jones and Eddie Glaude and poetry from Eve L. Ewing, and Eugene Scott will serve as the emcee.

Tickets required.

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Nov
2
7:30 PM19:30

Chicago Humanities Festival - Ida B. Wells [Chicago]

Born in Mississippi within a year of emancipation, journalist and activist Ida B. Wells lit up the lynching-laden, injustice-soaked Jim Crow-era south with boycotts, legal battles, and scorching editorials. As a fierce investigative journalist, she unveiled racist violence and humanized the stories of the victims. Despite her remarkable impact, Wells never received an obituary in The New York Times—until now. As part of a project called Overlooked, Wells’ newly penned obituary will join those of other remarkable women in history. Nikole Hannah-Jones; Michelle Duster (Wells’ great granddaughter); and Eve L. Ewing come together in recognition of the enduring legacy of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and the equally enduring fight for racial justice. Natalie Moore (South Side bureau reporter for WBEZ) will moderate.

This event is part of the Chicago Humanities Festival. Tickets here.

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Oct
24
4:00 PM16:00

University of Michigan - Poverty Solutions [Ann Arbor, MI]

  • University of Michigan School of Social Work (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

PLEASE NOTE CORRECTED DATE - THIS EVENT IS OCTOBER 24, NOT SEPTEMBER 24.

Real World Perspectives on Poverty Solutions introduces the key issues regarding the causes and consequences of poverty through a lecture series featuring experts in policy and practice from across the nation. This lecture series course features different guest speakers each week. Speakers are national and global experts drawn from university, business and community contexts who explore interdisciplinary real-world poverty solutions from a wide variety of perspectives. Free and open to the public. More info here.

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Oct
18
5:00 PM17:00

Ghosts in the Schoolyard - Official Launch

Join us for the official launch party for Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side, by Eve L. Ewing. This free event will feature a reading from the book, commentary and updates from organizers at the forefront of the struggle for public education in Chicago, a Q&A, and a signing.

Free. Tickets required - RSVP here.

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Oct
13
2:00 PM14:00

Boston Book Festival

Sometimes it is difficult to believe that people in positions of power are looking out for the public interest. In her amazing history of the opioid crisis, Dopesick, author Beth Macy traces the history of the epidemic, from the early days when Purdue Pharma put OxyContin on the market with dubious claims about its less addictive properties, to the present, when sympathy for those addicted to opioids may be plentiful but little funding for treatment is forthcoming, despite the predominance of the afflicted living in Trump country. Eve L. Ewing, in Ghosts in the Schoolyard, a “chilling must- read investigation of racism in Chicago’s education system” according to Foreword Reviews, asks what role race, power, and history played in the closing of 54 public schools in Chicago in 2013. The book offers a critique of the housing, education, and legal systems that contribute to the problem. This discussion of communities in distress will be led by Meghan Irons, reporter and City Hall Bureau Chief for the Boston Globe.

More info here.

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Oct
9
7:00 PM19:00

The Fest Presents: Intercepted LIVE! [Chicago, IL]

On October 9, The Fest Presents: Intercepted, a podcast hosted by reporter and The Intercept co-founder Jeremy Scahill, recorded live in Chicago. On Intercepted, Scahill examines the critical issues of our time with leading thinkers, writers, historians, artists, and activists. For this event, Scahill will be joined by writer Dr. Eve L. Ewing and Invisible Institute founder Jamie Kalven. More guests to be announced.

This event requires tickets.

Jeremy Scahill

Jeremy Scahill is one of the three founding editors of The Intercept. He is an investigative reporter, war correspondent, Oscar-nominated filmmaker, and author of the international bestselling books Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield and Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army.

Dr. Eve L. Ewing

Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education and a writer from Chicago. She is the author of Electric Arches. Her most recent book, Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side examines school closures and the vital role these public institutions play in communities. Dr. Ewing is also an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.

Jamie Kalven

Jamie Kalven is the author of Working With Available Light: A Family’s World After Violence. Kalven has reported extensively on police abuse in Chicago and was the plaintiff in Kalven v. Chicago, in which the Illinois appellate court ruled that police misconduct files are public information. His reporting first brought the police shooting of Laquan McDonald to public attention.

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Sep
29
1:00 PM13:00

Creative Chicago: An Interview Marathon

“Creative Chicago: An Interview Marathon” will be the first US-based marathon by Hans Ulrich Obrist, Artistic Director of London’s Serpentine Galleries, and one of the world’s leading curators, critics, and art historians. In 2005, Obrist hosted his first interview marathon—a 24-hour conversational exploration of art, ideas and creativity. The marathon format has become a central part of his practice ever since.

“Creative Chicago” will take a multi-dimensional, multidisciplinary look at creativity in the city—past, present, and future. Bringing together artists, authors, activists, architects, historians, musicians, philosophers and scientists, the “Creative Chicago” marathon will examine the numerous sparks that make the city a center for art, design and architecture.

Current participants include:

Amanda Williams, Artist
Art Green, Artist
Barbara Kasten, Artist
Brandon Breaux, Artist
Cauleen Smith, Artist
Dawoud Bey, Photographer
Eddie Bocanegra, Organizer/Activist
Eula Biss, Writer
Eve Ewing, Writer/Visual Artist
Fatimah Asghar, Poet
Gerald Williams, Artist
Jeanne Gang, Artist
Joseph Grigely, Artist/Art Historian
Louise Bernard, Museum Director, Obama Presidential Center Museum
Shani Crowe, Artist/Performer
Stanley Tigerman, Architect
Theaster Gates, Artist
Tim Samuelson, City Historian

The Chicago Humanities Festival will present this four-hour interview marathon as part of Art Design Chicago at Navy Pier in collaboration with EXPO CHICAGO 2018.

More info here.

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